Bain & Company

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Company
Bain & Company
Headquarters
Boston, MA
Employees
10,000 +
Industry
Consulting

Representation - Gender Identity

Male
Female

Representation - Race

Black
Asian
Latinx
Native American
White
Other

Handling the application process

June 2, 2020

You need a strong resume that indicates you're intelligent and hard working (can be signaled by high GPA and/or SAT), well-rounded with leadership experience (extracurricular involvements), and demonstrate quantitative skill (indicated by major, or previous internship experiences). Additionally, your cover letter should be tailored to Bain.

June 2, 2020

It's really important you start case prepping earlier rather than later. You should not wait until you have landed the interview to start preparing because by then, it may be too late. In addition to getting up to speed on how to solve a case, it is crucial you practice casing live and with a partner. You have to simulate the actual interview and that involves someone else feeding you the information you need. Casing is just part of interview process. There is also a behavior portion which is just as important. Bain prides itself on its culture so solving the case is not enough- you have to come with the right attitude and demonstrate you will be the right fit for the firm. The average Bain employee is social, enjoys having fun, and working with others.

May 29, 2020

You have to focus on networking, and networking effectively. I’ve realized that the people that ask for that 30 mins phone call get the most streamlined access compared to those that just send emails and essays explaining why they’re interested.

May 29, 2020

Treat your resume as three different sections, with your goal to stand out in one of those sections. Academics, work experience, and leadership experience. For example, if you have a strong GPA, make sure to highlight that. But if you don’t, make sure that your work experience or leadership experience stands out.

May 29, 2020

Be aware that the people you’re networking with are like you. Be respectful, but talk to them like you would your friends. Ask the hard questions, and they’ll answer them for you. If they don’t answer them, then that’s not a company you awant to work with.

May 29, 2020

Practice as many live cases as possible. The case interview is something that you get better at the more you do it. Practice with teachers and mentors; people that aren’t friends. For me, it was helpful to sit in an interview with someone who was older than me to simulate how the actual interview would be.

May 23, 2020

With Bain, a lot of first and second year employees are involved in the recruiting process. At information sessions, make sure you talk to people, and show your interest to consultants that attend the sessions, because they drive a lot of the recruiting. Look through your school's alumni database and see if there are people from your school that work at Bain. Focus on the office that you want to be in, find consultants and recruiters from that office, and network with them. Even if you're not from a top school, you can potentially get into your regional office just based on knowing 1-2 people that work there. Talk to employees and find our who is in charge of running the recruiting process at your school (typically their title is "School Team Lead").

May 23, 2020

Practice cases before you get to the interview. Read Case in Point - be creative and see if you can get the book without paying for it. I found a way to get the PDF version. When you get to the Bain Entrepreneurial Leaders program (BEL), practice cases with people in the program. Bain doesn't have a limit on how many people from BEL get offers, so don't think that it's a competition

Navigating the company culture

May 29, 2020

Focus on developing relationships with the people in your starting class. When you don’t know how to do something, it’s good to have those people that you can ask for help. Inevitably when your supervisor asks you to do something and you don’t know how to do it, it’s good to have those people you can go to and ask questions.

Succeeding in the promotion process

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Negotiating salary & benefits

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Shaping your career development

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June 11, 2020

Entry-Level

tenure:

Relationships with manager(s)

"My manager has been great. There’s this thing called Upward Feedback where we as associates have time to give feedback to our Supervisors and talk about our experiences. It’s been helpful because whenever I’ve had issues with my supervisors, it’s given me an avenue to openly talk about it. My supervisors have been overall positive. When someone’s telling you to do something, especially if you disagree one what they’re telling you to do, there’s always going to be some sort of push back. But supervisors have also been really open to hearing my feedback. "

Company culture

"There’s this mantra that “a Baine never lets a Baine fail.” I can reach out to anyone in my class or in the class above. You never really feel like you’re alone or set up to fail. It’s important to realize that asking for help isn’t a sign of weakness. "

June 6, 2020

Associate Consultant

New York, NY

tenure:

Less than 1 year

Diversity programs

I'm pretty involved with Blacks at Bain. The affinity group has served as a strong network and support system to have. Bain does a good job of trying to celebrate all the diversity in the office. In February, as part of our Black History Month programming, the BABs members hosted a panel where people shared their experiences being Black in America and in the corporate setting. This was a discussion open to the entire office and the turn out was significant- not just POC but white colleagues as well, interested in learning how to be better allies. Bain continues to create spaces for its employees to talk about their differences. Bain also makes sure diverse people feel supported. During my banking internship, there was a Black affinity network, and they would host events, but the events weren't convenient for you to go to. Whereas at Bain, if there's a BABs (Blacks at Bain) event, I would work with my manager to be able to attend the event, and it didn't feel like I was hindering my performance.

Diversity programs

Bain is the kind of firm where you get what you put in. If you feel like you're not getting the opportunities to challenge yourself and make sure that you're on track for promotions, all you have to do is voice your concern and there will be someone there to help you out. For instance, on my first case, both my manager and supervisor (person I work closest with) were white men. I noticed that whenever we'd have meetings, my manager would never look at me. Because of that, I never felt like I was brought into the meeting. Then, I got feedback that I didn't look like I was engaged, and that was partially because I couldn't tell what work was being allocated to me since my manager wouldn't look at me. I brought it up to my supervisor during one of our PD (professional development) feedback sessions. From there I noticed that my manager made an effort to bring me into the conversations. This improved my moral on the team.

End-to-end

In the corporate world, you can't assume that people are looking out for you; you have to be your own advocate. It's important to understand that you have a lot more agency than you think. It's easy, especially when you're a junior person, to just sit back and feel like you don't have any power. As minorities, we feel as if we have to stay in our lane. However, at a place like Bain, where everyone is pretty receptive to hearing what you need and what you want, I've been able to develop a mindset that I know I can take control of my situation. If you don't stand up for yourself, nobody will. I think that's really important, especially when you start thinking of your long-term career aspirations.

June 3, 2020

Associate Consultant

tenure:

1-3 years

Application and interview process

I did the Bain Entrepreneurial Leaders program (BEL) for rising juniors. I interviewed my sophomore year and had to do two cases. I practiced cases with friends and didn't do much solo interview prep. The actual interview is a conversation, so you want to just put yourself in that situation as much as you can.

Promotion discussions

Bain is very transparent about how promotions work. They have a detailed skills tracker that tracks your progress. That's the framework for how they do professional development. I talk with my supervisor every two weeks and my manager every three weeks to see where my strengths and gaps are on the skills tracker. By the end of your second year, you should get your first significant promotion. You have to decide how you want to manage your professional development. For me as a minority, I was diligent about having open conversations about my performance because I was dealing with imposter syndrome and anxiety. I was struggling my first year at Bain, and I felt like I had to prove myself. I wasn't as confident about a variety of skills - quant skills, presenting in meetings, etc. - and people were really willing to help me develop those skills. It showed me how much people at Bain will invest to ensure I have a successful career here. As I gained more confidence, I valued the transparency of these conversations for other reasons - people highlighted strengths that I wasn't even aware of. These were just as helpful to be aware of because I made sure to shine in certain situations and play to my strengths, which also contributed to me being promotion-ready.

Diversity programs

I love Blacks at Bain. It's a space where people are instantly supportive. It's a space where you can meet people that work in the office and interact with them on a personal level. In college, I was involved with student activism and working with administration to improve things for people of color. I was nervous about bringing that energy to the corporate world because I wasn't sure how open people would be to it. In my first year, I was able to host an office-wide event. At the event, employees shared experiences to express the idea that while Bain is a great place to work, there were issues that needed to be addressed. We also got into small groups and discussed ways to make the workspace more inclusive. Bain's culture is great. Even now, during COVID, Bain is working with a non-profit to help combat the discrepancies for the Black community, since they've been hit harder by the COVID than other groups. You don't have to limit what kind of impact that you want to have at Bain. Every idea that I've had has been welcomed by the company.

Relationships with manager(s)

Teams are usually 4-8 people, with a Manager that oversees the work streams and helps you manage conversations with senior clients. They're less involved with your day-to-day work in your first and second year unless you report to them directly. Supervisors are the people that are directly responsible for executing workstreams within the team, and then the Associate Consultant owns a specific piece of that workstream (typically quantitative analyses). Supervisors are people that you work with regularly. I've had some Supervisors that micro-manage, and I've had some that are more flexible. When you work with someone so closely for so many hours in a day, there are inevitably growing pains and issues that come up. I regularly do upward feedback for my supervisors. It's not common to do but I've found my supervisors to be very receptive and willing to figure out a resolution that works well for both of us.

June 6, 2020

Overall

Salary

$85,000

Associate Consultant

New York, NY

tenure

Less than 1 year

Diversity

Representation

Recruiting and retention

Diversity programs

role transparency

Accuracy of job requirements

Accuracy of job description

opportunity

Promotion and upward mobility

Training and career development

Contribution to work

environment

Work-life balance

Work flexibility

Work inclusiveness

May 29, 2020

Overall

Salary

85000

Entry-Level

tenure

Diversity

Representation

Recruiting and retention

Diversity programs

role transparency

Accuracy of job requirements

Accuracy of job description

opportunity

Promotion and upward mobility

Training and career development

Contribution to work

environment

Work-life balance

Work flexibility

Work inclusiveness

May 23, 2020

Overall

Salary

$95,000

Associate Consultant

tenure

1-3 years

Diversity

Representation

Recruiting and retention

Diversity programs

role transparency

Accuracy of job requirements

Accuracy of job description

opportunity

Promotion and upward mobility

Training and career development

Contribution to work

environment

Work-life balance

Work flexibility

Work inclusiveness

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